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Some Counties Struggle, but Still Provide In-Home Care Services to Residents in Need 

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Some Counties Struggle, but Still Provide In-Home Care Services to Residents in Need Counties across the country continue to struggle in finding ways to pay for services their residents require. With increasing numbers of people requiring some type of support at home, it means more Americans may go without. The majority of the population depending on in-home care services are elderly, but disabled adults and those recovering from major medical emergencies, injuries, or surgery might also require some type of long-term care. 

Home care aides and visiting nurses are some of the integral components that allow people to remain home where they’re most comfortable. Unfortunately, when counties struggle financially, they may not be able to provide the optimal level of care and support to its residents or have any availability at all if the system is overwhelmed. 

In some regions, non-profit organizations have stepped in to offer financial assistance to essentially fill in the where Medicaid either falls short or residents don’t have or are not eligible for insurance to cover these services. In West Virginia, two counties are seeing the benefits that outside support can have so they may continue offering invaluable in-home care support to its citizens. 

As noted by The Exponent Telegram in its blog, Free in-home care, counseling top services provided by Family Services of Marion and Harrison County WV, written by Jonathan Weaver: 

““The United Way has been a lifeline for counseling and in-home care for quite a while because the funding sources that we have do not compensate the cost of running this program,” Jones said. “United Way allows us to supplement the program, as well as provide free services to individuals who do not have a funding source and do not have the ability to pay. 

“Our counseling, for sure, is heavily dependent on United Way dollars. We have a lot of people who need the counseling but don’t have insurance or aren’t eligible for Medicaid.”” 

Many people who look after elderly and disabled individuals are truly kind and compassionate; they love what they do. However, they can’t provide these services for free and as the federal government continues to slash Medicaid spending for home health care support services, it forces states and counties to find other ways to pay for these important services. 

It has also become difficult to find and retain quality home care aides and visiting nurses because of relatively low wages, but without an increase in Medicaid spending, agencies that rely heavily on this government program for reimbursements can do little about it. These outside funding sources, though, could provide a window of opportunity for aging men and women to get the help they need at home even when they don’t qualify for insurance coverage or as Medicaid falls short.

Valerie VanBooven, RN BSN, Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com

Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com at LTC Expert Publications
Valerie is a Registered Nurse, Author, and Co-Owner of LTC Expert Publications. Read More at http://www.LTCSocialMark.com
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Some Counties Struggle, but Still Provide In-Home Care Services to Residents in Need 
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Some Counties Struggle, but Still Provide In-Home Care Services to Residents in Need 
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Counties across the country continue to struggle in finding ways to pay for services their residents require. With increasing numbers of people requiring some type of support at home, it means more Americans may go without. The majority of the population depending on in-home care services are elderly, but disabled adults and those recovering from major medical emergencies, injuries, or surgery might also require some type of long-term care. 
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