Home Care Aides Left Unable to Care for Aging Clients in Need Due to Agency Owner’s Fraud 

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Home Care Aides Left Unable to Care for Aging Clients in Need Due to Agency Owner’s Fraud A 102-year-old New York resident is just one of many elderly and disabled adults who are now finding themselves scrambling to get proper care at home. That follows the seizure of assets of the owner of a home care agency. Now, those home care aides and other providers aren’t getting paid. 

When a person can’t get paid, they may be able to work for another week or two, but in reality they have to look elsewhere. They need to survive. Most home care providers aren’t earning much beyond minimum wage, which means they likely live paycheck to paycheck. That also means when they don’t get paid for work provided, it can have devastating repercussions. 

When Farrah Rubani, 51, was investigated for embezzling home care funds and indicted on December 13, the rippling effects would not be immediately felt for a couple of weeks. Unfortunately, those home care providers working for her company were hit hard right at the Christmas holiday. 

The New York Daily News reported in its article, Home health aides for 102-year-old woman left in lurch after home care exec bilked NY State Medicare for $11M, written by Ellen Moynihan, Catherina Gioino, and Janon Fisher: 

“As a result of the criminal investigation and the civil suit, the AG froze Hopeton’s assets — which threw the lives of hundreds of home health care aides across the five boroughs into chaos. 

Suddenly the workers — who care for the sick and elderly — couldn’t get paid. But even as their salaries disappeared, the demand for their services did not. 

Caregiver Lydia Campbell, one of two women employed by Hopeton to tend to Queens centenarian Rose Lawson, spent Christmas and New Year’s wondering when her check would arrive.” 

Now, many of those aging men and women who depend on that level of care have been left to wonder where they can get help now. This has also meant those aging seniors and families have been scrambling and have tapped into savings or wherever they can find available funds just to bridge the gap until covered care can once again start. 

The article went on to add: 

“Since Hopeton’s assets were seized, Murphy’s had to dig into her own pocket to come up with $180 a day to contribute to Rose’s care — even though her aunt qualifies for a suite of social services on top of her pension and her Social Security check. But Murphy can’t keep it up anymore, and that puts Campbell and Joan in a no-win situation.” 

Home care fraud affects more than just anonymous names of taxpayers; it can directly impact the dedicated home care providers who offer these services and the clients and family who depend on them.

Valerie VanBooven, RN BSN, Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com

Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com at LTC Expert Publications
Valerie is a Registered Nurse, Author, and Co-Owner of LTC Expert Publications. Read More at http://www.LTCSocialMark.com
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Home Care Aides Left Unable to Care for Aging Clients in Need Due to Agency Owner’s Fraud 
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Home Care Aides Left Unable to Care for Aging Clients in Need Due to Agency Owner’s Fraud 
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A 102-year-old New York resident is just one of many elderly and disabled adults who are now finding themselves scrambling to get proper care at home. That follows the seizure of assets of the owner of a home care agency. Now, those home care aides and other providers aren’t getting paid. 
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HomeCareDaily.com
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