Shortage of Personal Care Attendants Eyed as Contributing to More Fraud in the Industry 

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Shortage of Personal Care Attendants Eyed as Contributing to More Fraud in the Industry In another case involving fraud within the home care industry, a woman has been charged with claiming she had been providing in-home care support to a client while she was actually working a second job. This level of fraud allegedly cost Minnesota taxpayers almost $10,000 through Medicaid. 

According to court records, Kenya Gordon, 34, of New Hope was billing Medicaid for home care support services she claimed to have provided to an elderly couple while she was working another job. In short, she never performed the work she claimed. These alleged incidences happened while Ms. Gordon was supposed to be supporting an elderly couple in their home in 2014 and 2015. 

While she was allegedly carrying out this fraud, she was working for a home care company, A Caring Company. A representative for A Caring Company admitted they had no idea Ms. Gordon was working another job at the time and has since repaid all unauthorized payments back to the state’s Medicaid program. 

According to an ABC 5 Eyewitness News report, Home health care worker accused of fraud, advocates call out larger problem: 

According to a probable cause statement filed by the Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Unit, Gordon “submitted over 200 instances of overlapping claims” between her work under PCA provider, A Caring Company, Inc. and Coram Healthcare. 

In one quarter of a year, investigators say Gordon exceeded 1300 hours at both jobs. That would have required her to work more than 14 hours a day, every day, for three months. 

A Caring Company, which is not accused of any crime, declined requests for an on-camera interview, but told 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS it has paid back all unauthorized money to the state and that Gordon is no longer associated with the agency. 

According to the representative for the home care agency, Ms. Gordon came to the agency under the state’s PCA Choice program. She came to the agency along with her clients. According to court records, Ms. Gordon’s trial is set to begin in July. After repeated attempts to reach her, there was no answer at her listed residence and her attorney did not return calls seeking comment. 

It’s unclear why it took over four years for the state’s Medicaid investigators to uncover this level of fraud or whether Ms. Gordon worked for other clients in the time since. Fraud continues to be a problem for the Medicaid system that reimburses home care workers, but due to diligent and persistent effort, there has been a significant crackdown in these cases. 

Valerie VanBooven, RN BSN, Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com

Editor in Chief of HomeCareDaily.com at LTC Expert Publications
Valerie is a Registered Nurse, Author, and Co-Owner of LTC Expert Publications. Read More at http://www.LTCSocialMark.com
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Shortage of Personal Care Attendants Eyed as Contributing to More Fraud in the Industry 
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Shortage of Personal Care Attendants Eyed as Contributing to More Fraud in the Industry 
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In another case involving fraud within the home care industry, a woman has been charged with claiming she had been providing in-home care support to a client while she was actually working a second job. This level of fraud allegedly cost Minnesota taxpayers almost $10,000 through Medicaid. 
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HomeCareDaily.com
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